Great ShakeOut 2019 | Earthquake Preparedness

TSE is proud to be an Official Participant in the 2019 Great ShakeOut, to promote earthquake disaster preparedness. TSE is looking forward to participating in this drill, and we strongly encourage all to participate. ShakeOut began in California and has also been organized in many other states and countries. Official ShakeOut Regions require significant local or regional coordination, typically by an emergency management agency or an alliance of many organizations.

A key point of the ShakeOut mission, is the promotion of Drop, Cover, and Hold On during an earthquake. During an earthquake, you may only have seconds to protect yourself. Strong shaking can knock you down, or cause any number of things to fall on you. By practicing, just as any other discipline, you can be prepared to act quickly or properly during an earthquake.

From ShakeOut.org

    • If you are inside a building, move no more than a few steps, then Drop, Cover and Hold On:
      • DROP to the ground (before the earthquake drops you!),
      • Take COVER by getting under a sturdy desk or table, and
      • HOLD ON to it until the shaking stops.

      Stay indoors till the shaking stops and you are sure it is safe to exit. In most buildings you are safer if you stay where you are until the shaking stops.

    • If you are outdoors when the shaking starts, you should find a clear spot away from buildings, trees, streetlights, and power lines, then Drop, Cover and Hold On. Stay there until the shaking stops.
  • If you are driving, pull over to a clear location, stop and stay there with your seatbelt fastened until the shaking stops. Once the shaking stops, proceed with caution and avoid bridges or ramps that might have been damaged.

Ground shaking during an earthquake is seldom the cause of injury. Most earthquake-related injuries and deaths are caused by collapsing walls and roofs, flying glass and falling objects. It is extremely important for a person to move as little as possible to reach the place of safety he or she has identified because most injuries occur when people try to move more than a short distance during the shaking.

Look around you now, before an earthquake. Identify safe places such as under a sturdy piece of furniture or against an interior wall in your home, office or school so that when the shaking starts you can respond quickly. An immediate response to move to the safe place can save lives. And that safe place should be within a few steps to avoid injury from flying debris.